Anish Kapoor «Descent into Limbo» 1992.


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Descent into Limbo, 1992
Courtesy: De Pont Collection, NL.

Documenta 9: The great problem is that the space demands verticality. This is contrary to every notion about sculpture that I've ever engendered in my work. So I felt that the only way to deal with the vertical is to deal with the full horizontal, to take on its glorious 160 metres. What I have done for the space is to make a work which is in three distinct volumes, connected to each other by a linking hose. The forms transmute into each other through the medium of this hose. I made a drawing about 30 years ago which relates to this, a computer drawing of a circle changing into a square. I determined the two ends; the computer 'imagined' the rest.

Space is as complex. The space contained in an object must be bigger than the object which contains it. My aim is to separate the object from its object-hood. I think of this work as a sort of descent into limbo, a sort of going below, going beneath, going underground, even though it's completely above ground. What I'm trying to deal with is a sense of disorientation, that causes one to readjust one's view, even if it's only for a minute, in order to sort of re-sight oneself in relation to the volume, in relation to the colour and so on. At the heart of this is darkness. ~ Anish Kapoor

Source: tate.org.uk